Chocolate Chip Cookies

February 13, 2006 Posted by bob in Cooking - (Comments Off on Chocolate Chip Cookies)

375* 8-10 minutes

  • Mix together
    • 2 1/4 cups unsifted all-purpose flour
    • 1 tsp baking soda
    • 1 tsp salt
  • In a separate bowl:
    • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
    • 3/4 cup brown sugar packed
    • 2 eggs
    • 1 tsp vanilla
    • 1 cup butter, softened
    • 1 cup chopped nuts (optional)
    • 2 cups (12 oz) semi-sweet chocolate chips

Mix gradually mix the two together and drop rounded spoonfulls onto ungreased cookie sheets.

 

Rice Crispy Treats

February 1, 2006 Posted by bob in Cooking - (Comments Off on Rice Crispy Treats)
  • 1/3 cup butter
  • 45 marshmallows
  • 5 1/2 cups rice crispy cereal.

In a large saucepan, over low heat, melt butter and marshmallows, stirring until melted. Remove from heat. Stir in rice crispy cereal. Using a buttered spatula, press mixture into a buttered 13×9 pan. cool.

 

Aunt Diana’s Pecan Pie

November 21, 2005 Posted by bob in Cooking - (Comments Off on Aunt Diana’s Pecan Pie)

Diana Dunnington 11/2005

Preheat oven and bake at 300 F, 60 Minutes Place pie on center rack in oven

Combine:

  • 1 C dark brown C & H sugar (Don’t substitute sugar brands on this one. All other brands are white sugar with caramel added and change the flavor and consistency of the product)
  • 1C White corn syrup (Karo)
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 1 tsp real vanilla

Beat:

  • 3 whole eggs until very-very frothy

Stir: all above together. (set aside ½ cup of mixture as reserve)

Add: 1 ½ C pecans and stir (I use pecan pieces and don’t chop them up.)

Pour filling into a 9” raw single pie shell (You can purchase the shell in the frozen section of most grocery stores, or use a cook book for instructions)

Bake 60 min. Watch to make sure the top does not get to brown. I like to dress the top with a few ½ pecans to make it look extra special.

Cool, then refrigerate. Be sure to refrigerate left overs.

**I reserve a 1/2C of the egg mixture before adding the nuts and filling the pie shell. If I find I have room for any of the reserve mixture I add it before cooking. If there isn’t room, I dump it.

 

Apple Streudel

November 20, 2005 Posted by bob in Cooking - (Comments Off on Apple Streudel)

350* in a 13x9x2 pan for 45-50 minutes

  • Pour bready mix into pan, then spoon apple mix over it. It’ll displace the bread mix, not make layers.
    • Make apple mix: melt in large sauce pan on medium heat for 15 minutes or until thick
      • 1/2 cup butter
      • 8 cups apples (about a 5 pound bag)
      • 1 1/4 cups sugar
      • 1/4 cup bisquick
      • 1 tsp cinnamon
      • 2 tsp nutmeg
      • 1 tbsp lemon
    • Make bready mix: blend in bowl and pour evenly into pan
      • 2 tsp vanilla
      • 3 1/3 cups bisquick
      • 1 14 cups sugar
      • 2 cups milk
  • Make sprinkle mix: easiest to pour in shot glass, cover with hand, and shake. Then sprinkle over filled pan
    • 2 tbsp sugar
    • 1/2 tsp cinnamon

 

Banana Bread

Posted by bob in Cooking - (Comments Off on Banana Bread)

350* until toothpick is clean (about 30-40 minutes)

  • Mix together
    • Mix together in one bowl
      • 3 1/2 cups flour
      • 1 tsp baking soda
      • 3 tsp baking powder
      • 1 1/2 tsp salt
      • 1 1/2 cups sugar
    • Mix together in separate bowl
      • 2 eggs
      • 2 cups bananas (about 4-6 bananas)
      • 1 cup milk

This makes a good banana bread. You can add walnuts if you have them. If the mix is too thin in the pan it’ll cook faster and get harder, so be careful.

 

OLD Personal Projects

June 1, 2004 Posted by bob in Building | Computers - (Comments Off on OLD Personal Projects)

In high school I played around in my basement bedroom a lot. I discovered some neat things, some things that I still can’t explain, and some very useful things.

One thing I worked on was a sound system. I found a couple speakers and a really old amplifier at Goodwill and rigged them together. The sound quality wasn’t professional, but it was more than enough to do what I wanted. It wasn’t even stereo, but I could get it loud. Then I took apart an alarm clock and rewired the speaker output into the sound system. Occasionally I would have the amplifier volume a little loud and I would wake up EVERYBODY in the house at 6am for school. Later I took my 386 computer apart and wired the internal speaker output to the amp. The computer didn’t have a sound card, so this was my only option.

Another thing I played with was input devices. I took a keyboard apart and tapped into the wires for the arrow keys. Then I took apart two pens and taped them so they were perpendicular to each other. I put a small piece of metal in each that would slide around easily. Then I taped paper clips on each end so that the pieces of metal would make two separate paper clips touch and complete a circuit. The circuit it would complete was the arrow key. I then attached this small contraption to a glove. The end result was a motion sensitive glove that could tell whether my hand was tilted forward, backwards, left, or right, and would send the appropriate arrow key through the keyboard to the computer. It was the cheapest glove ever.

One of my experiments involved plugging a socket into a bucket of water. Bubbles of hydrogen and oxygen appeared at the terminals. After a few days, so much of the wire had corroded that the tub was blue-green with copper. There wasn’t really a point to all of it, just the coolness of seeing science doing what it was supposed to.